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Name of author Rick Baker, P.Eng.

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Educate your brain: don't just stuff it full of facts and demand it work harder - mould it so it does a good job of thinking.

by Rick Baker
On Oct 13, 2018

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

If you are thrilled with the way your mind and brain are serving you...terrific!

If you are not thrilled - take your mind to a better place...as one example, train your mind how to think more positively...another example, train your mind how to govern self-control.

Unresolved, lingering problems gnaw away at brain energy. Attack problems and pluck that destructive power away from them.

by Rick Baker
On Oct 12, 2018

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

The brain represents 2% of body mass while it consumes 20% of body energy. 

The brain is 'energy intensive'.

Much brain energy is consumed/wasted on negative thinking - i.e., wasted on negative feelings and emotions...wasted on rumination & worry.

You gain energy-value when you reduce your brain's energy-waste.

So - Tackle problems quickly: hit 'em high, hit 'em low...rip the ball out from their hands.

Most people tend to express problems in ways that do not reveal the true source of their pain.

by Rick Baker
On May 22, 2018

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

And most people reply to such cries for help with cries for help. [Eckhardt Tolle]

It's all about the huge influence our unconscious brain exerts, as part of the human condition.

 

Other people prefer it when you are present-minded rather than absent-minded.

by Rick Baker
On Mar 16, 2018

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

'Getting present' is a Focus exercise...a mind-process of narrowing and fixing attention. 

'Staying present' is a Concentration exercise...a mind-process of holding attention.

These two mind-processes, focusing and concentrating, involve different areas of the brain and they require the development of different skill sets. For me, and it may be different for you, focusing is an exercise of thought discipline. It requires thought discipline to cause attention to dwell on the single isolated situation or topic, ignoring everything else. This discipline can be very challenging. Similarly, concentration can be challenging when tasks are tedious or uninteresting. On the other hand, I find concentration easy when the topic or situation is one I am very interested in or excited about. 

Tags:

Beyond Business | Brain: about the Human Brain | Thought Tweets

When troubles consume your thoughts, remember "Your tooth will cease aching if your house is afire..."

by Rick Baker
On Jun 14, 2017

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

"Your tooth will cease aching if your house is afire..." Frank Channing Haddock made that point in his 1910 classic, 'Power of Will'. 

Long before the medical sciences confirmed the concepts of neuroplasticity, people knew the awesome power & virtually unlimited possibilities available to the human mind. 

If emergencies can remove the pain of toothaches then properly trained minds can do the same thing.

Our minds have the ability to remove the 'negative feelings and thoughts' we encounter during day-to-day life.

A thin skull allows important stuff to get in easier.

by Rick Baker
On Jun 4, 2017

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

Mistakes bang into and bounce off thick skulls.

This annoys Mistakes because their role is teaching lessons.

The problem is: When thick skulls won't let them in Mistakes cannot teach lessons to thick-skulled brains.

So Mistakes keep coming back, knocking on thick skulls over and over and over again.

While Mistakes are born to be great teachers, over time they tend to develop an uppity attitude and a nasty sense of humour. Even when they've given up on teaching well-concealed brains Mistakes have no desire to stop knocking on the thick skulls that house those brains.

The key foresight point is: We can count on Mistakes to come back over and over again to knock on our skulls if we keep them thick.

The bottom line is: As long as our skulls remain thick we will never have the opportunity to learn the lessons taught by Mistakes.

 

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