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Name of author Rick Baker, P.Eng.

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Most people tend to express problems in ways that do not reveal the true source of their pain.

by Rick Baker
On May 22, 2018

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

And most people reply to such cries for help with cries for help. [Eckhardt Tolle]

It's all about the huge influence our unconscious brain exerts, as part of the human condition.

 

Other people prefer it when you are present-minded rather than absent-minded.

by Rick Baker
On Mar 16, 2018

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

'Getting present' is a Focus exercise...a mind-process of narrowing and fixing attention. 

'Staying present' is a Concentration exercise...a mind-process of holding attention.

These two mind-processes, focusing and concentrating, involve different areas of the brain and they require the development of different skill sets. For me, and it may be different for you, focusing is an exercise of thought discipline. It requires thought discipline to cause attention to dwell on the single isolated situation or topic, ignoring everything else. This discipline can be very challenging. Similarly, concentration can be challenging when tasks are tedious or uninteresting. On the other hand, I find concentration easy when the topic or situation is one I am very interested in or excited about. 

Tags:

Beyond Business | Brain: about the Human Brain | Thought Tweets

When troubles consume your thoughts, remember "Your tooth will cease aching if your house is afire..."

by Rick Baker
On Jun 14, 2017

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

"Your tooth will cease aching if your house is afire..." Frank Channing Haddock made that point in his 1910 classic, 'Power of Will'. 

Long before the medical sciences confirmed the concepts of neuroplasticity, people knew the awesome power & virtually unlimited possibilities available to the human mind. 

If emergencies can remove the pain of toothaches then properly trained minds can do the same thing.

Our minds have the ability to remove the 'negative feelings and thoughts' we encounter during day-to-day life.

A thin skull allows important stuff to get in easier.

by Rick Baker
On Jun 4, 2017

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

Mistakes bang into and bounce off thick skulls.

This annoys Mistakes because their role is teaching lessons.

The problem is: When thick skulls won't let them in Mistakes cannot teach lessons to thick-skulled brains.

So Mistakes keep coming back, knocking on thick skulls over and over and over again.

While Mistakes are born to be great teachers, over time they tend to develop an uppity attitude and a nasty sense of humour. Even when they've given up on teaching well-concealed brains Mistakes have no desire to stop knocking on the thick skulls that house those brains.

The key foresight point is: We can count on Mistakes to come back over and over again to knock on our skulls if we keep them thick.

The bottom line is: As long as our skulls remain thick we will never have the opportunity to learn the lessons taught by Mistakes.

 

Multi-task for mediocrity or focus for excellence.

by Rick Baker
On May 27, 2017

The Thinking Behind The Tweet

Brain experts are telling us: The uptrend in multi-tasking, especially multi-tasking involving high-tech communication devices, is changing neural patterns by strengthening some paths and weakening others. The neural paths that allow us to talk on the cell phone while surfing the web or creating a spreadsheet are strengthening while the neural paths that allow us to focus and concentrate are taking a back seat.

As this trend continues huge numbers of human beings will be able to do huge amounts of mediocre stuff.

We have a choice: we can choose to multi-task our way to mediocrity or we can focus & concentrate for work-performance excellence.

Put another way: we can choose to multi-task or we can choose to task-multi. [And major success only happens when we choose the latter.]

 

Criticism, Adrenalin Spikes & Improving Relationships

by Rick Baker
On May 15, 2017

Some people naturally repulse criticism. These people may show outward signs of their repulsion. These people may not show outward signs, or their repulsion may hide so well it would take a professional observer to notice it. Regardless, internally, these people churn in reaction to criticism. For these people - even small, innocuous pieces of feedback can trigger intense internal reactions, floods of adrenalin – adrenalin spikes.

  1. Do you know people who show vehement reaction to tiny criticisms…people who have zero tolerance for incoming criticism?
  2. Do you know people who, at first, show no outward reaction to criticism then, later, strike excessive reactionary blows against the person who delivered the criticism?
  3. Do you know people who have the habit of claiming they are the victim of undue criticism?
  4. Do you know people who repulse criticism yet deliver it to others with gusto and righteousness?

These are four common reactions to criticism.

I have personally exhibited at least three of these four reactions to criticism…and, probably, many people would think I’m selling myself short by not admitting to all four.

Why?

Why would I have had such reactions to criticism?

Not having much knowledge of physiology or biology and only dabbling experience with psychology I answer that question this way:

  • When people criticized me, I experienced adrenalin spikes [or was that cortisol?]. I felt strong, churning, tightening sensations in the gut…quickly followed by combinations of anxiety and anger, often intense anger...then excessive negative thoughts and behaviour.
  • This reaction must have started when I was a very young child. I have no memory of reacting any other way to criticism [until the last decade, that is].
  • Perhaps, my criticism-repulsion was are due to genetics? Perhaps, my childhood environment? Perhaps, my early experiences with authority figures? I expect it was some combination of these things.

Here’s a curious thing. When you experience criticism-repulsion as a child you can be quite oblivious to other people. And, this can cause challenges…a large variety of interpersonal challenges. Left unattended, these interpersonal challenges can last a lifetime.

Here’s some good news. It is possible to gain self-understanding and create strategies to overcome the interpersonal challenges. The starting point, or at least one starting point, is recognition of the physiological changes that signal less-than-ideal reactions to criticism. People, perhaps most people, can alter their bad habits [including adrenalin spikes] if they choose to make the changes and do the work required.

 

PS: Perhaps, the people who experience the criticism-repulsion I have described are most capable of identifying it in other people? ... and helping others?  

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